Category: Aesop’s fables

Aesop’s Fables: The Wolf and the Lamb

A stray lamb stood drinking early one morning on the bank of a woodland stream. That very same morning a hungry wolf came by farther up the stream, hunting for something to eat. He soon got his eyes on the lamb. As a rule Mr. Wolf snapped up such delicious morsels without making any bones…


Aesop’s Fables: The Wild Boar and the Fox

A wild boar was sharpening his tusks busily against the stump of a tree, when a fox happened by. Now the fox was always looking for a chance to make fun of his neighbors. So he made a great show of looking anxiously about, as if in fear of some hidden enemy. But the boar…


Aesop’s Fables: The Lion and the Mouse

A lion lay asleep in the forest, his great head resting on his paws. A timid little mouse came upon him unexpectedly, and in her fright and haste to get away, ran across the lion’s nose. Roused from his nap, the lion laid his huge paw angrily on the tiny creature to kill her. “Spare…


Aesop’s Fables: The Heron

Aesop (c. 620–564 B.C.) was a Greek storyteller credited with a number of fables now collectively known as “Aesop’s Fables.” His tales, with their moral value, have long influenced our culture and civilization, contributing not only to the education and moral character building of children, but also, with their universal appeal, to the self-reflection of…


Aesop’s Fables: The Frog and the Mouse

Aesop (c. 620–564 B.C.) was a Greek storyteller credited with a number of fables now collectively known as “Aesop’s Fables.” His tales, with their moral value, have long influenced our culture and civilization, contributing not only to the education and moral character building of children, but also, with their universal appeal, to the self-reflection of…


Aesop’s Fables: The Dog & His Reflection

Aesop (c. 620–564 B.C.) was a Greek storyteller credited with a number of fables now collectively known as “Aesop’s Fables.” His tales, with their moral value, have long influenced our culture and civilization, contributing not only to the education and moral character building of children, but also, with their universal appeal, to the self-reflection of…


Aesop’s Fables: The Miller, His Son, and Their Donkey

Aesop (c. 620–564 B.C.) was a Greek storyteller credited with a number of fables now collectively known as “Aesop’s Fables.” His tales, with their moral value, have long influenced our culture and civilization, contributing not only to the education and character building of children, but also, with their universal appeal, to the self-reflection of adults…


Aesop’s Fables: They’re Not Just for Children

The canon of Western literature is like some storied gold mine, deep and old, and filled with riches. The Bible. The “Iliad” and the “Odyssey.” The “Aeneid.” “The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius.” “The Canterbury Tales.” Dante’s “Divine Comedy.” The plays of Molière and William Shakespeare. Jane Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice.” Tolstoy’s “War and Peace” and…